How Sleep Helps Prevent Some Diseases

After a good night’s sleep, its normal for you to wake up feeling much better, and well rested. This is not only due to the fact that your body gets the rest it deserves after a busy day, but is also linked to a variety of positive effects of getting the right amount of sleep.

To enjoy the health boosting effects of sleep, it is essential that you get the necessary amount of sleep each night. The recommended amount of sleep for adults is anything between seven to eight hours each night; while children should get about nine to ten hours of sleep every night.

Read on below to learn more about how sleep helps prevent some common diseases.

Immune System Boost

Did you know that lack of sleep can affect your immune system? This means that the body’s ability to fight various diseases and recover from illness is compromised.

When we sleep the body produces essential proteins referred to as cytokines. These proteins not only help you sleep better, in addition to providing a boost to the immune system when the body is fighting off an infection or illness. When you don’t get enough sleep, the production of these cytokines is reduced substantially. Furthermore, the production of disease fighting cells and antibodies is also reduced by a substantial amount when you don’t get enough sleep for an extended period.

Furthermore, the production of disease fighting cells and antibodies is also reduced by a substantial amount when you don’t get enough sleep for an extended period.

Inflammation

Lately, the term inflammation has been increasingly used in the medical world to describe people’s physical health status. Generally, too much inflammation is bad for your health. It can lead to arthritis, heart disease and stroke among others.

Failure to get enough sleep, even for one single night, can lead to a substantial increase in the levels of inflammation in the body. Additionally, anyone who regularly gets less than 6 hours of sleep each night faces a higher risk of increased inflammation levels.

Diabetes

Failure to get enough sleep for even a week substantially increases your risk of developing diabetes. Healthy adults experience a 40 percent dip in their body’s ability to produce insulin when they get about four hours of sleep each night, for a week. This is at a similar level as the people who are not able to produce enough insulin due to diabetes.

Simply put, failure to get enough sleep substantially increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, getting the recommended amount of sleep each day helps your body break down sugars as it can produce the required amount of insulin.

Obesity

It is normal for you to feel hungrier whenever you stay up too late. This also means that your risk of gaining weight and developing obesity increases. This is because lack of sleep affects the body’s rate of metabolism, insulin production and hunger hormones.

Lack of sleep also increases your risk of developing obesity by making it harder for you to work out. When you don’t get enough sleep you end up feeling fatigued, and are less likely to work out at a high level of intensity.

Finally, when you become overweight, you end up in a dangerous cycle where you cannot get enough sleep, and are therefore at risk of gaining even more weight due to the development of a condition referred to as sleep apnea.

Depression

You feel less irritable and happier after having a restful night of sleep. This directly implies that getting the recommended amount of sleep helps improve your mood. For people fighting depression, this can be a lifesaver. Lack of sleep is considered to be one of the main symptoms of this condition.

As you can see from the above, getting the necessary amount of sleep each night not only leaves you feeling well rested but also helps prevent a variety of common diseases.